Math = Love: Algebra 2 Interactive Notebook Pages for Unit 1

Saturday, August 31, 2013

Algebra 2 Interactive Notebook Pages for Unit 1

This year, I have resolved to do a much better job at the interactive notebook in Algebra 2 than last year.  Last year, we had 12 students in my entire school who were enrolled in Algebra 2.  This year, that number is just under 40.  This is both exciting and kinda terrifying.  First of all, it means that more students are prepared and willing to take Algebra 2.  At the same time, my Algebra 2 students this year are greater in number and much more varied in level.  This presents many challenges.  But, these are challenges I am excited to attempt to meet.

Our first unit in Algebra 2 is an introduction to functions, function notation, domain and range, intercepts, maximums and minimums, intervals of increasing and decreasing, finding solutions, and transformations.  My goal is to create a foundation which I can build off of once we start linear functions.  I am also working hard to prove to my students that they are capable of doing Algebra 2 level work.  Many of my students have extremely low confidence.  We are also learning how to use the graphing calculator.  This is the first experience any of my students have had with a graphing calculator, and I am working hard to make it a positive one.

So far, my Algebra 2 students are loving our interactive notebooks.  They thank me on an (almost) daily basis for making Algebra 2 visual, fun, and easy.  I have some students who are complaining right now that Algebra 2 is too easy.  I told them that they just had to wait.  Before they knew it, we would be exploring logarithms, exponentials, conic sections, and all kinds of other exciting mathematical relations.  After going on and on about how excited I was about everything we were going to be learning and studying this year, one student asked, "Do you like math?"  I was a bit taken aback by this question.  Are there math teachers who don't like math?  Of course, I like math.  I love math!  I eat, breath, and sleep math.

You'll notice that I love printing my foldables on colored paper.  I think that notes taken on colored paper are just more memorable than notes taken on plain, white copy paper.  My students often remember which page in their notebooks they need to reference by what color the foldable was printed on.  The paper I use the most is Fireworx brand colored paper.  It's available from Amazon, comes in loads of colors, and is priced very reasonably.  Astrobrights paper makes for the prettiest, brightest foldables, but it's a bit more pricey.  So, I save it for printing posters.

Boise Fireworx Color Copy/Laser Paper, 20 lb, Letter Size (8.5 x 11), Cherry Charge, 500 Sheets (MP2201-CHE)

Link to download these files is at the end of the post as always. :)

My Algebra 2 Interactive Notebook

Algebra 2 Unit 1 Table of Contents (Thus Far)
 I have already blogged about the NAGS foldable I had my Algebra 2 students create here.

NAGS Foldable - Outside

NAGS Foldable - Inside

NAGS Chart
I still haven't found a better way to practice differentiating between function/not a function than this card sort.  I blogged about this last year.

Function / Not a Function Card Sort
We also created a Frayer Model for the word "function."

Function / Vertical Line Test Frayer Model

I stole this coordinate plane foldable from Ms. Haley and her wonder Journal Wizard blog!  I think this is a big improvement over the coordinate plane foldable I did with my students last year.  I created a template for this foldable which I have linked to at the end of this post.
Parts of the Coordinate Plane Foldable

Parts of the Coordinate Plane Foldable

Parts of the Coordinate Plane Foldable
 Our notes over independent and dependent variables were less than exciting.  Maybe next year I will come up with a card sort or something.  Hmm...
Independent and Dependent Variable Notes
 Last year, my students had a TERRIBLE time remembering the difference between domain and range.  This summer, at the amazing Common Core Training I received from the Oklahoma Geometry and Algebra Project (OGAP), I was introduced to an amazing resource--Shmoop.  They have amazing commentary for each and every high school common core math standard!  I learned about the DIXROY acronym from their commentary on F-IF.1.  
Domain and Range Notes - Interactive Notebook
DIXROY stands for "Domain - Inputs - X-Coordinates and Range - Outputs - Y-Coordinates."

DIXROY Acronym for Remembering Domain / Range
 I was able to re-use the domain/range notation foldable that I created last year for my Algebra 2 students.  My students were VERY confused by the different notations.  I haven't yet figured out a way to introduce these notations without overwhelming my students.  They recovered, eventually.

Domain and Range Notation Foldable - Outside

Domain and Range Notation Foldable - Inside
 I downloaded the domain and range cards from this blog post.  There are 32 cards which give my students 32 opportunities to practice finding the domain and range!  
Domain and Range Foldable
We made a tiny envelope to hold our 32 cards.  Let me just say - having the students cut out all 32 cards took WAY too much time.  I was about ready to pull my hair out.  I think we might of spent half of a fifty minute class period just cutting these cards out.  But, we used them a lot, so I think it was worth it.

I LOVED the envelope template that Kathryn (iisanumber.blogspot.com) posted earlier this summer.  I downsized her template to the exact size needed to fit the domain and range cards I linked to earlier.  

The Cutest, Tiniest Envelope to Hold our Domain and Range Practice Cards
Then, I took inspiration once again from Ms. Haley at Journal Wizard.  She had her students create an interactive domain and range finder foldable.

Domain and Range Foldable (That sadly doesn't photograph well...)
As you can see, this foldable perfectly holds the domain and range practice cards from our handy-dandy envelope!

The foldable is made to perfectly hold our domain and range practice cards that are housed in the envelope. 
Students fold over the domain tabs to help them determine the left-most and right-most points on the graph.  If the graph goes approaches negative or positive infinity, the students leave the flap open where it reads positive or negative infinity.  I wanted my treatment of domain and range to be much more hands-on this year, and I think this foldable does the trick!

After doing many, many cards together, I had students find the domain and range of all 32 cards as homework.  They had to write the domain and range in both interval and algebraic notation.  (And, the discrete graphs had to have their domain written in set notation.)  The next day, I gave them an answer key to use the check their work.

The Domain and Range Foldable in Action
One of the main thing my students need to be able to do on their Algebra 2 EOI is to describe graphs.  This foldable is an attempt to introduce my students to the concepts of x-intercepts, y-intercepts, relative maximums, relative minimums, increasing intervals, decreasing intervals, roots, solutions, and zeros.

Describing Characteristics of Graphs Foldable - Outside
Because there is so much information on this one foldable, this was a perfect opportunity to use COLOR WITH A PURPOSE.  Each term was marked with a different color.  And the corresponding part of the graph was marked with the same color.  This is one of my favorite foldables that we have done this year!  

Describing Characteristics of Graphs Foldable - Inside
AKA - Proof I LOVE color-coding!
 I've posted some close-ups of the flaps if you'd like to see what I had my students write.
Close-up of Right Flaps

Close-Up of Left Flaps
 Last year, my Algebra 2 students really struggled with the concept of an inverse.  So, this year, I decided to start talking about inverses very early in the school year.  This will allow us to revisit the concept over and over as we explore different types of function in a much more in depth manner.  By the time the EOI rolls around, my students should no longer be scared when they see the word inverse!
This foldable was inspired by @druinok's post from February.

Inverse of a Function Foldable - Outside
I want my students to be able to find the inverse if they are given a set of points, a graph, or an equation.  Since we have only just started exploring functions in general, the examples we went through were quite simplistic.  We will explore much more complicated inverses as the year progresses!

A lot of my students were terrified when I told them that we would be learning about inverses.  By the end of the lesson, they were amazed that inverses were actually quite easy.

Inverse of a Function Foldable - Inside

Inverse of a Function - Important Fact!  
I still have to figure out how I want to introduce transformations to my Algebra 2 students.  That topic should end our first unit.  Hmm...

Files can be downloaded here.


59 comments:

  1. Sarah, your interactive notebook for unit 1 is amazing!! Thank you for sharing. I taught some of these same topics this first week - wish I had your insight on foldables!

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  2. Wow, wow, wow! That's an excellent collection of foldables. I love what you did with the domain and range foldable. I've had my kids use post-its before to mark off the lowest and highest values, but I love how the flaps show +/- infinity as well. My other favorite is the foldable that goes over all the characteristics of a graph. By the way, thanks for the shoutout on the envelope. Glad it could help!

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  3. Thanks for all the resources and links! I am a German, math, and physics teacher currently teaching just German. I'm trying INB ideas for German notes, and your blog is a great source of inspiration!

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  4. Sarah, you are crazy generous and your kids did crazy amounts of work. Congrats!
    Amy

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  5. I just have to write to tell you how amazing you are for sharing all this, and to thank you from the bottom of my heart. You are an excellent resource, and I almost feel as though I'm "stealing" these ideas from you, but the fact of the matter is that I'm teaching five preps (Geometry, Algebra II, PreCalc, AP Calc, and Business Math), and I just don't have enough time to devote to planning each lesson that I would like. I've been dying to try interactive notebooks with my Alg II students, and thanks to your insight, I'll be able to do it, at least part-time, this year. Thank you again and again!

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  6. To answer your question-- yes, there are math teacher who don't like math. I am one of them, LOL. I am a middle school special education teacher who is only teaching math this year, which is quite possibly my least favorite subject-- though my kids can relate to the fact that I struggled with math during middle school. :P
    While many of these foldables are beyond what I will cover with my students, you have given me a lot of great ideas. I will definitely be consulting your blog as a resource!. :)

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  7. Santa Vaca! That was amazing! Its good to see how you set up your Unit 1 and what foldables you used to get concepts across.

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  8. I love, love, love your blog! I am new to Alg 2 and to interactive notebooks and you have such great ideas. I wish I would have remembered to come to your blog last week as it would have saved me some headaches. Out of curiosity, are you teaching from the Common Core State Standards?

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    1. Thank you! This year, I am not teaching directly to the Common Core State Standards. We have one year left of testing over our old standards, so I am teaching primarily to them. However, I attended an amazing Common Core training this summer, and I am trying to match my teaching to the CCSS whenever possible.

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  9. I absolutely love your blog! I have implemented an Interactive Notebook in all of my math classes this year and I love it so much. Your ideas, as well as many other bloggers, are so fantastic! I figured you might get a chuckle on some of the following student commentary this week:

    -Ugh this class is like kindergarten.
    -But kindergarten was fun!
    -Stop complaining or Miss Nelson will take away the markers and crayons, guys!
    -Miss Nelson, I'm glad you don't make math hard.
    -Do we need markers AGAIN?
    -I don't want to take a boring math class next trimester. Can you teach {insert other math class here} next time?
    -I like coloring.
    -I don't like coloring.
    -When are we gonna be done with these foldy things?
    -Why do we have to glue something EVERY day, Miss Nelson?
    -Someone stole my notebook!!!
    -Wait... I found it.
    -This is weird.
    -Can you cut this for me, Miss Nelson?
    -Who wrote my name on my notebook?

    Oh, the joys of interactive notebooks and math class. Thank you for providing me with an excellent resource for helping remedial students who are preparing to retake their state Algebra ECA in 2 months! Keep up the amazing work!

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    1. Thanks! I LOVE your students' comments. Your students sound a lot like mine! This week, I asked my students to draw a table in their interactive notebooks. I was looking for an x/y chart like the one I had already drawn on the Smart Board. As we started filling out the chart, one of my students became really confused. When I had asked my students to draw a table, she had taken this to mean a literal table... There is definitely never a dull moment when working with high school students!

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  10. I love your blog! There are so many great ideas. I am curious about how you go about making the foldables and visuals while lecturing. Do you lecture as you make them or make them first and talk about them second...or finally (haha) lecture then make the visuals to reinforce the concepts?

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    1. Hi Jill! I know this isn't exactly the answer you are looking for, but I do a combination of all the different ways you mentioned. Usually, I lecture as my students make them, but I've also done them both of the other ways. Sometimes, I even let my students vote on which way they would prefer me to do it.

      If it's a topic that I believe my students might already be familiar with, I will probably lecture as we make the foldables. If it is a completely foreign topic to my students, we will usually make the foldable, talk about the material, and then reference the foldable as we work practice problems. This past week, I introduced my students to transformations of functions. We spent an entire class period exploring transformations with as little lecture as possible. Then, on the second day we created a foldable to summarize what we had discovered on the previous day.

      Good luck!

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  11. I just want to say THANK YOU for your blog. It's been a few years since I took Algebra I & II in high school and now that I'm in college algebra it seems that I've forgotten much of what I learned. Your simple foldables (which I am a huge fan of) have put a lot of the ideas into an easy to understand format that just might help me get through this math class. THANK YOU again!

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    1. I'm so glad that my blog could be of assistance! Good luck with your college algebra class!

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  12. These are AH-MAY-ZING; you are reinforcing my teacher crush that started last year - thank you thank you!!

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  13. LOVE your coordinate plane foldable! I'll use that to review later in the year :)

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  14. I am going into a 6th grade unit dealing with coordinate plane. I like this foldable also. Thank for the idea!

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  15. Are you posting every unit like this? If so...I think I'm in love. =)

    Really thinking about doing INBs next year in Algebra II but in a binder versus composition book. Thoughts?

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    1. Yes! If you click on the Algebra 2 tag on the right hand side of the screen, it should load all of my Algebra 2 INB units.

      I've never used binders with my students, but I don't see why you couldn't do an INB in a binder. In fact, I see many benefits in that approach!

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    2. I have used binders and I have used composition books, and I like composition books because the pages don't rip out as easily, so they are less likely to loose important foldables, and less likely to borrow paper for it from another class. However, I like the pockets you can put in binders, so I have students use a cardstock copy of the formula sheet that is allowed on our state End of Course Test, and create a pocket folder on the inside front cover with it. They tape the bottom of the formula sheet to the inside cover, and the left side (the side closest to the outside edge, so things don't get lost) down, and then they have a pocket.

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    3. Awesome idea! Thanks for sharing!

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  16. Ms. Hagan,
    Thank you so much for sharing! Your foldables are amazing! Does one notebook lasts the whole year, or do the students have multiple notebooks? I started using an interactive notebook this year, but the students were throwing them away as they ran out of pages:(

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    1. Hi Elena! I only have students keep notes in their notebooks. So they last us quite a while. All assignments are done on worksheets. And, they are not stored in the notebook. I've never filled up more than half a composition notebook before.

      Thanks for your sweet comment!

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  17. I just found your blog!!! You are absolutely amazing!!! I wish I had found this before I started teaching Algebra 2. Do you have any plans to show how you would organize other Algebra 2 units? I really floundered this year, and my students and I barely made it out with our heads still on! Thanks so much!!

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    1. Hi Jonell! Thanks so much for your kind words! I have posted the rest of my Algebra 2 units on my blog as well. They're a little hard to find at the moment. I'm hoping to get some online organizing done this summer. But, here is the page with all of my Algebra 2 stuff on it. There's quite a bit, so you will have to click "Older Posts" at the bottom of each page. http://mathequalslove.blogspot.com/search/label/Algebra%202

      Good luck! If you need help with anything, just let me know!

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  18. Hi, Sarah, great job with this unit. I am planning to use your domain and range foldable this year in my Algebra 2 class. My students struggled with that all year long last year.
    You mentioned you were wanting to find a way to teach transformations. I used a foldable at the beginning of the year emphasizing a, h, and k, and what they mean for a function, and we referred to it all year. At the end of the year, students were able to easily find and distinguish between the three variables that indicate transformation. Unfortunately, I don't have an electronic copy. It looked a bit like your y=mx+b foldable, with y=a(x-h)+k, and explanations under each part. I also had them indicate that there were different kinds of grouping symbols under the parentheses.
    One of these days, I need to start blogging so I can share these things with everyone. You are a shining example of what's RIGHT in education these days--keep it up!

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    1. Thanks, Melissa!

      I would love to see your transformations foldable!

      And, you should DEFINITELY start blogging! Please, please, please!

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  19. you're blog is amazing! i am going to try IN's with my Lab Algebra 2 class (this is the class with my inclusion teacher). I think the extra support might be necessary my first year! I'm so excited to utilize some of your great ideas!

    also, just as an idea, but i always teach transformations as a graphing calculator activity. looking at the graphs of the equations and comparing it to what is changing in the equation. trying different types of transformations with different types of equations and letting them create "rules". these rules could then be transferred to a foldable to keep in their notebook.

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    1. Thanks! Good luck with trying interactive notebooks next year! I think your students are going to benefit SO much from them. My advice - spend lots of time modeling how the notebooks can be used as a reference. When you are thinking aloud as you do a problem, reference your notebook. Have your students turn to the page and read the definition. Read each step as you do it. The more students reference the notebook at your prompting, the more likely they will reference it when they are working on their own. My students LOVE, LOVE, LOVE the notebooks. Our special ed teacher loves them, too.

      I like the idea of teaching transformations using the graphing calculator. I've done this at a workshop before. I think I will definitely try this out this year!

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  20. Love Love Love!!! Just sent this link to two other math teachers! Amazing!

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    1. Glad you like these notebook pages! Please share away!

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  21. I am a math teacher in Philadelphia, PA. I use foldables in my classroom, but not as often as I would like to. I plan to use an interactive notebook next year for my advance math classes (Precalculus, IB Math Studies, etc.) I thank you greatly for the examples you posted on functions and their graphs. Keep up the great work! Perhaps you could do a webinar on your teaching ideas.

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    1. Thanks! Good luck with implementing an interactive notebook next year! They are such a great learning tool. A webinar could be fun. Let me think about this!

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  22. Is there an answer key for the domain and range activity. I am not very experienced with interval notation and want to make sure I have them correct.

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    1. I made an answer key last year, but I'm afraid it's long gone. This is what happens when I write answer keys on notebook paper and file them away in random places in my classroom... Sorry!

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  23. Hello! I would love it if you could email me the domain and range foldable as well as the increasing/decreasing one? It am so inspired by your ideas!

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    1. Taryn! E-mail me at mathequalslove(at)gmail(dot)com, so I can send the documents your way! Thanks for reading my blog!

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  24. This might be a little too forward but I'm pretty sure I LOVE YOU! Thanks for all you do and share! Got any recommendations on Domain and Range notes for Algebra 1? camfan54@att.net or lrichardson@ccisd.net

    Thanks!

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  26. Do you have on your website a copy of the domain and range card you used in the foldable?

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  27. Do you provide your students with all the colored construction paper? That must cost you a lot!

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    1. It does cost a bit. But, colors are pretty and so worth it.

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  28. Well this seems legit... I mean lol.

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  29. Hi Sarah,
    I love the idea of your the domain and range tool. Would you be willing to share the domain and range practice cards that you use with the tool?
    Thanks

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    1. I downloaded them from this blog: https://thescamdog.wordpress.com/2012/10/26/domain-and-range-lesson/

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  30. Thanks for the sharing. These are excellent.

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  31. Thank you for all the wonderful resources!!!

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  32. The embedded files are not working anymore. I don't know if there was a flash player update that made them incompatible, but is there anyway I could get the files please? I was planning on using some of these with my Algebra I class.

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    1. Link fixed! Thanks for letting me know! https://app.box.com/s/91j7w4ugsk8neftxl64w

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  33. Sarah, did you have students just identify the increasing and decreasing intervals or actually write them in interval notation? Any reason you didn't do positive and negative intervals?

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    1. We wrote the increasing and decreasing intervals in interval notation, too. My students REALLY struggled with it, though. I don't do positive and negative intervals because they're not in the OK standards. Otherwise, I'd do those at the same time.

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  34. Hi! I love the domain and range foldable. Do you have a copy of the practice cards they used? I didn't see it in the files, but I would love to use this resource in my class!

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    1. Hi Morgan!

      Here's the link to the blogpost where I stole the domain/range cards. http://thescamdog.wordpress.com/2012/10/26/domain-and-range-lesson/

      Thanks for reading my blog!

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