Math = Love: Students Speak Out About A/B/Not Yet

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Students Speak Out About A/B/Not Yet

This year, I only gave three different grades for each assignment or quiz.  An A.  A B.  Or a Not Yet.  If students didn't make an A or a B on an assignment or quiz, they had to retake it until they did.  I still have plans to write up a reflection and comprehensive post about this approach, but that will take some time.  Until then, enjoy my Algebra 2 students' advice to future students about this grading system.



Students Speak Out: 

Her grading scale could be an angel or the devil.

Ms. Hagan's class can be difficult at first, but you will eventually get used to it.  To get good grades, redo every paper you get a Not Yet on until you get an A or B.  Make sure you know all the material really well, or else you will get left behind.

If you have a not yet, come make it up.  You're dumb if you don't because you could literally have a 100% in this class all year just by making up work.

The grading scale may seem like it sucks, but she will help you by letting you redo your work.  It actually helps you learn the material better.

I complained a lot about the A, B, and Not Yet grading system, but now I realize that I wouldn't have learned anything, and I would have had a good grade on the end.

This class is challenging, but you have to push through the difficulty.  Take full advantage of Ms. Hagan's grading system.  It will help you out in the end.

Some people hate the grading scale Miss Hagan uses, but if you show effort to get your grade up, it is really easy.  But, if you don't have the time to come in and make up homework and retake tests, then you can just bring her a cat or something to do with cats, and that might help you get on her good side at least.

All I can say is you will hate the grading system.  Everyone does.  The people that say they like it are lying.  Trust me.

With Ms. Hagan's grading system, it is easy to fail this class.  However, if you keep track of all of your assignments, you will have an extremely high A.  Trust me.  You will get Not Yets.  Don't stress about it.  All you have to do is take another one.  With my personal experiences, my grade varies from a 93% to a 62%.  That is what not-yets do.

You cannot fail her class unless you just don't try to pass.

If the grading system is still in place, don't accept zeroes or any other grade besides a one hundred.  Otherwise, it is likely your grade will drop.

You can learn a lot in this class, so pay attention.  A lot of us complain about her and her grading system, but she really is a great teacher.

Attend the parent teacher conference for her class because that's likely your only chance for extra credit because she doesn't believe in extra credit.

Another good word of advice is to not be afraid of asking for help.  Asking for help is something vital for making a good grade in this class.  Not asking for help allows your not yets to pile up fast.

Tests are usually harder than the examples she gives you.  But, you should be able to retake the test or fix your problems on papers if Ms. Hagan keeps her grading style.

The tricks Ms. Hagan uses really help.  She makes things seem easy.  Your grade should stay up if you really care and pay attention.

Ms. Hagan's grading system is really good.  It gives you a great chance to make really good grades in her class.

Ms. Hagan is always willing to help you with your grade if you're willing to.  She will let you come in at anytime to make up your work or to help you with it.

Just be sure to work hard.  No one likes getting NOT YETS, and I mean no one likes them.

You probably get the grading scale "A, B, Not Yet."  It's annoying, but it actually helps you out with this class.

Show all your work, or you'll get a Not Yet.  :(




18 comments:

  1. Did students make up the missing work at home or in study hall/lunch with you? I'm a science teacher and have been asked to teach one section of 7th grade math this upcoming year- your site has been a goldmine for ideas! Thanks!!

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    1. I concur, it has been a fabulous experience for me and my students as well!

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    2. Thanks guys! Students made up missing work before school, after school, and at lunch - whatever worked best for them.

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  2. Did all/most of the students who got a Not Yet retake until they got at least a B? That would be a fear I would have - students who fail because they don't bother to retake. Or does this not happen much?

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    1. Most students did. I had a handful of students who refused to redo their assignments/quizzes, and they ended up failing. Almost all of my students who chose to retest regularly ended up with an A or B in the class.

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  3. I love the optimism behind the "not yet" rating. Hopefully you will remain in the classroom and not join the profitable lecture circuit or the educational bureaucracy, two ventures that do little for the education of our children.

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  4. I love "not yet". I've tried to do something like that, but I never really made a big deal about it. I will be making a poster and a big deal about it next year!

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    1. Yes, I definitely make a huge deal out of not yets!

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  5. I'm thinking about doing SBG next year and am interested in your grading scale too. What did you put in the gradebook for an A, B, and not yet? Did you have to convert it to 100% scale? Love your blog!!

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    1. This past year, I did A = 100%, B = 85%, and NOT YET = 0%. Some have suggested NOT YET should equal 50%.

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  6. You grade EVERYTHING as 100, 85 or 0?

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    1. Yes. Then, 0's must be redone until they are 85's or 100's.

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  7. Could you be more specific about how you convert your grades?
    We use a 10 point scale here.
    Does a student who gets an A (90-100) receive a 100?
    What would a student who gets a B (80-89) receive?
    A student who scores below a B (0-79) gets a 0 (zero)?
    Thanks.

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    1. Zero mistakes = 100 (A)
      Minor mistake = 85 (B) with possibility to retake
      Major mistake = 0 with requirement to retake

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  8. I love this idea. What kind of feedback to you get from your administration and parents? I worry about 0% for not yet. 50 is still failing but reflects that some effort was put forward, unless of course it really was a 0. I always worry about losing students too early in the year with no hope of grade recovery,

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    1. I think it's up to you and what will work best for your students. My concern about the 50 is that if students build up their grade first nine weeks, they can just earn 50s for the rest of the semester and still be able to pass without mastering any more concepts for the rest of the semester.

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    2. True. I teach 7th grade so I don't think they think that far ahead. :)

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