Math = Love: Always, Sometimes, or Never? Resources for Math Class

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Always, Sometimes, or Never? Resources for Math Class

After successfully using Always, Sometimes, or Never? to help my students gain a better conceptual understanding of the measures of central tendency (link to blog post), I began to wonder what other math topics I could use the Always, Sometimes, or Never? structure with.


I spent part of an evening googling for resources.  I thought I should share my findings with you guys as well.  Have you used Always, Sometimes, or Never? to review other concepts?  Please leave a comment!

Algebraic Properties


Angles



Area and Perimeter


Equations


Evaluating Expressions


Fractions


Geometry


Linear Equations and Inequalities


Maxima/Minima


Measures of Central Tendency


Miscellaneous


Negatives


Number Sense


Parallel and Perpendicular Lines


Points, Lines, and Planes


Quadrilaterals


Rational and Irrational Numbers


Similarity


Transformations


Trig


5 comments:

  1. Thank you for all of these awesome links! I will definitely be bookmarking this page.
    I have an always, sometimes, never on quadrilaterals here: https://crazymathteacherlady.wordpress.com/2013/11/20/always-sometimes-never/

    Tracy Zager also has a collection of always, sometimes, never on her book's awesome companion site here (scroll to the bottom):
    http://sites.stenhouse.com/becomingmathteacher/chapter-10/

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  2. I have always, never, and sometimes with graphs of Quadratic Functions. It really makes students think beyond a choice of A, B, C and D

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  3. I love always,sometimes, never!
    I used a resource I found on TES and changed it into a Desmos activity for arithmetic sequences here: https://teacher.desmos.com/activitybuilder/custom/58c5f0da348d1905ef658496

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  4. A/S/N with systems of equations.... If two equations have the same slope, the system has no solution. If two equations have the same slope and y-intercept, the system has many solutions. If two equations have the same y-intercept, there is one solution.... etc.

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